Give yourself credit

Give-yourself-some-creditSometimes I read articles or blog posts filled with references to what this or that authority figure has said about the topic at hand, and then the post ends. I suppose the opinions of authority figures can be interesting, but they can also be awful. There’s nothing about being relatively well known that automatically confers either wit or wisdom!

At times like that I’m reminded of a priest who served part time at an Episcopal Church I belonged to during the 1990s whose every sermon contained between three and five Gilbert_Chestertonreferences to GK Chesterton. This priest, a bright and eloquent man, never got around to telling me what he thought about the topic at hand. I remember thinking that if I wanted to know what Chesterton thought, I could buy a book – I wanted to know what he thought.

Don’t sell yourself short. Tell me what you think! I really want to know! By the way, I still don’t own a GK Chesterton book!

Story

We tend to get caught up in story, as can be clearly seen by the reactions to the election of Donald Trump. Something happens and our minds go to work. In a matter of minutes, wepresent-moment have constructed a story of how whatever has happened will play out, and that story rarely has a happy ending. We can turn the discovery of a hang nail into an amputated arm in under a minute. We see the hang nail, then convince ourselves infection will set in, then move to the infection being uncontrollable, and – presto! – we are certain our new nickname will be lefty.

The truth is that we don’t know what the future holds, so all of the time we spend constructing story is at best wasted time. At worst, it’s time we spend worrying about disasters that will never happen rather than living our lives. Live in the present moment!