Behavior and Spiritual Credibility

To be completely honest, I have struggled with this issue for years. Living, as we do, in an era where a constant procession of spiritual leaders of all stripes have been outed as serial abusers of those in their charge, I don’t see how we can avoid dealing with the issue and asking the question:

At what point does the abusive misbehavior of a spiritual leader render their teachings invalid?

Craig Bergland

Suppose we attempted to construct a spectrum of abuse that started with a spiritual leader having an adulterous affair with someone not involved with his ministry in any way and progressing to whatever the most horrific offenses we might imagine. For the purposes of our discussion, let’s say up front that consensual sex between non-married adults is perfectly fine. What transgressions are redeemable and what transgressions invalidate a person’s spiritual teachings? It may help to establish some categories of offense for sorting purposes.

Can we agree that any sexual activity involving minors should preclude that individual being allowed to teach? Would it render their teachings null and void? Catholic priests involved in the pedophilia crisis would fall into this category, but so would Rumi due to his pederasty. Many of Rumi’s supposed love poems to God weren’t written to God at all but to Shams, his adolescent protege. To be honest, that turns my stomach more than a little.

Can we agree that teachers who engage in sexual relations with their students have crossed a line? Buddhism in particular seems to struggle with teachers who can’t keep their hands to themselves, assaulting female students during spiritual interviews. Others overtly create situations wherein sleeping with the teacher is presented as being spiritually advantageous, even when the student is married. Perhaps the most notorious example of this in Buddhism is Chogyam Trungpa, who established an entire lineage replete with sexual misconduct. Only recently has anything been done or said about this, but it has been an open secret for almost fifty years. Despite that truth, there is no shortage of former students of Trungpa who still speak effusively about his teachings. What are we to make of that? In the interest of candor, for me, Trungpa’s behavior does invalidate his teaching.

What about with colleagues or the parish secretary? We talk about imbalance of power as being an important factor in determining if a relationship is appropriate, but I suspect that power is much more complicated. There is power in hierarchies, but there are all sorts of power structures in social and cultural settings that muddy the waters. When Jim Bakker had an affair with church secretary Jessica Hahn, there were surely multiple psychological factors at play. It’s hard to know who was being manipulated more, but I suspect there was mutual manipulation at work. Then again, since Bakker’s teachings were vacuous at best, perhaps he is a bad example.

Complicating all of this is the truth that nobody is perfect. All of us make mistakes on a regular basis. That being said, abuse is a mistake of a different stripe. I am not concerned about clergy who fall in love with the parish secretary. I would be concerned about clergy who fell in love with every parish secretary they ever had. I wouldn’t necessarily be concerned about a spiritual teacher who once fell in love with a student. I would be very concerned about a teacher who slept with many or most of his students. These issues are important because we all share a responsibility in ensuring those seeking to develop their spiritual life can do so free from harassment. They are also important because they speak to the character of the teacher, which has a direct impact on the teacher’s ministry and teachings.

I am Discouraged

I’ll be honest with you – I am profoundly discouraged. A significant portion of America is either stupid, morally bankrupt or both. Truth no longer matters, doing the right thing no longer matters, the ability to analyze an argument seems to be beyond at least a plurality of Americans, and it seems that any behavior is justified if it brings me more bullshitpower and allows me to get the outcome I want. That’s true in politics, it’s true in social media, it’s true in casual conversation, it’s true in our churches (especially Evangelical and fundamentalist ones), it’s true in the judiciary – quite simply, it’s true more places than it isn’t true.

I have been thinking about this problem for a very long time. Realistically, we probably don’t have a higher percentage of idiots than we always have – though one could argue that the systematic disassembly of education by Republicans in this country has left us with more under educated people that ever before. What is different today is that we seem to have lost anything even remotely resembling a moral compass. That’s a situation that began with the political right crawled into bed with the religious right and presidentevilpower became the idolatrous god of both.

I have heard many people say that we will have to come together as a nation, that the left and the right and everyone in between will have to find a way to get along. I’m not so sure. When I see people in all walks of life advocating policies and practices which hurt other people so they can get ahead, when I see people supporting a President who is profoundly mentally ill and quite possibly devoid of a conscience, what I see is evil. I am not inclined to make nice with evil. Sorry, Charlie.

For a more in depth look at the issue of evil, check my other blog (www.theinterspiritualtraveler.org) tomorrow.