Facts is Facts

I saw an interview on one of the news channels of a corona virus denier. The man said that he didn’t really believe the virus was any worse than the flu. When the reporter countered with the fact that (at that time) there had been over one hundred fifty thousand deaths in The United States, the interviewee responded “I don’t agree with that number.” This one statement reflects the heart of the problem – facts are not opinions.

You can’t disagree with a fact, at least not if you are a rational human being. Perhaps more accurately, you can’t disagree with a fact without dire consequences. If you disagree with the fact of gravity, it will not end well for you. When presented with a fact, our job isn’t to agree or disagree, but to respond. We need to ask ourselves how we are called to respond in light of the fact. Pretending the fact doesn’t exist will only lead to foolish choices. Sadly, at this point in time we see many people making just such foolish choices and paying the price for them. Still the fact deniers continue. Maybe that’s the appeal of denying facts. Maybe you feel quite wise and powerful until you don’t, but then you’re dead so you avoid responsibility for your foolishness. That’s a steep price to pay for a few seconds of delusional certainty.

I believe that part of the reason we see so many people eager to exchange opinion for fact is that we have, as a culture, bought into the idea that we have to be perfect. That idea is fiction, nothing more. We learn from making mistakes, and nobody comes into this world immune from mistakes. Mistakes are how we learn, and to avoid them is to ensure than we learn nothing. It is uncomfortable to fail, sometimes profoundly so, but I have never had a failure that wasn’t a learning experience. Pretending that we have never failed reveals more about us that any success ever could.

Avoiding Self-Sabotage

get-out-of-your-own-way-blog-imageIf you are anything like me, you have experienced more than a few incidents of self-sabotage over the course of your life. At the time, you thought what you were doing was perfectly reasonable. You just wanted to think things through, develop a plan, avoid mistakes down the road, make sure you don’t embarrass yourself, anticipate problems, avoid conflict, make sure you took care of the details in advance, had everything down pat, knew your subject matter forwards and backwards, talked to the right people, got the right permissions, ran some feasibility studies, grabbed a nice dinner…and, to your great surprise, you never started your project.

Of course nobody wants to look like a fool, but none of us are perfect. We make mistakes. In fact, you might say that the only person who ends up looking like a fool is the person who believes they won’t make mistakes. If something is worth doing, then it is worth taking some chances and actually doing it! We can’t succeed if we don’t start, and quite often it is our fear, not of failure but of success, that keeps us stuck! We don’t know who we would be if we tried something new, so we settle for our current situation. The devil we know is better than the angel we don’t.

And, at the end of our lives, we just might find we never lived. Don’t let that happen.