Civil Discourse

As anyone who has been even remotely aware of the current election cycle is only too aware, civil discourse seems to be a thing of the past in America. Gone are the days when we could agree to disagree and still be friends. The old joke about the note in the margin of Image result for angry discoursethe preacher’s sermon text (“point weak, pound pulpit here”) seems to have been adapted by the public at large. Somewhere along the way it became the case that volume is more important than facts or reasoning. This will only change if and when we decide to change it, and we must begin by changing ourselves.

We must be gentle with ourselves and others. That includes being gentle about what we allow ourselves to take in via the media. So-called “Reality TV” is nothing more that drivel that conditions us to believe that poor behavior is acceptable and entertaining. Stop watching it and it will go away. Never speak when angry. Consider what you are going to say before you say it and ask yourself the three big questions:

  1. Is it kind?
  2. Is it true?
  3. Is it necessary?

If you can’t answer all three questions with “yes,” don’t say it.

Save every email you write for at least an hour, then reread it. If you still think it meets the above three criteria, then push “send.” Don’t air your dirty laundry on social media, and don’t believe what you read on the Internet without finding external verification. Limit your television time, read books instead, and go for a walk. These few simple steps can make a very big difference!

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